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 Ford Receives High Marks from Salaried Employees in 2012 Pulse Survey

DATE: Will be calculated from "Release Start Date" field.

​DEARBORN - Ford Motor Company received high marks from salaried employees throughout the world who took part in this year’s global Pulse Survey, which is designed to measure employee satisfaction in the workplace and help the company understand issues and concerns that employees may have.

“As a company, we can take a lot of pride in the year-over-year improvements we’ve made on Pulse. It shows that we are continually working to improve results and relationships, both at the senior leadership level and at the workgroup level,” said Felicia Fields, group vice president, Human Resources and Corporate Services. 

“These improvements help us retain existing employees and strengthen our ability to recruit more talented employees to deliver our One Ford plan."

Seventy-five percent of Ford’s 75,000 salaried employees across the globe responded to this year’s survey, which included 55 multiple-choice questions across 12 dimensions of life in the workplace, such as Training and Development, Management’s Commitment to Diversity, Quality Work Practices and Safety. 

Nine of the dimensions showed improvement over last year.  Two areas were unchanged.   And one dimension – which measured employee awareness and understanding of the company’s global Go Further brand promise – was new to this year’s survey.

“Over the past five or six years, we’ve not only maintained high scores on the Pulse Survey, but we’ve been able to grow and improve them,” said Nick Mills, manager, Personnel Research.  

The Employee Satisfaction Index (ESI) section of the survey – which asks employees questions like whether they feel valued at work and whether they believe people are rewarded for their job performance – increased two percentage points from last year. 

“The ESI is our main bellwether of employee satisfaction, and that jump is quite good,” he said.  “Our ESI score is also five percentage points above our external benchmark, which is comprised of a group of Fortune 500 companies like Boeing, Intel, Microsoft and Siemens.”

Mills says Ford exceeded the benchmark group in all questions on the survey where external benchmarks are available.

“We scored the best – 13 percentage points above the benchmark – on the question that asked employees whether they feel satisfied with the information they receive from management on what’s going on with the company,” he said. 

This year’s Pulse Survey also showed a huge improvement over last year in the area that measures Management’s Commitment to Diversity.

“The question that asks employees whether top management at their location demonstrates through actions that diversity is a priority was up nine percentage points, which is a huge jump,” he said.  “In fact, two of the

Top Five questions that improved the most on this year’s survey were from the Diversity dimension.”
In the dimension of the survey that asks if people feel like their work teams are demonstrating One Ford behaviors, this year’s results continue a pattern of improvement that has been steady over the last five years. 

“Employees continue to embrace the One Ford plan,” said Mills. 

Scores were also quite high in the Global Brand Promise section of the survey.  Because this area was new to the Pulse Survey this year, the results were compared with those of similar questions asked in the 2012 Global Engagement Survey conducted earlier this year. 

“This is a reflection of employee awareness and understanding of our global brand promise,” explained Mills.  “We made a pretty big jump of six percentage points in awareness and a huge jump of 14 percentage points in understanding of the Go Further message.”

Mills says he believes the Pulse Survey results are continuing an upward trend in recent years because managers and supervisors are doing a great job feeding data from the survey back to their employees and working with their teams to make improvements.

“Each year following the survey, we send managers and supervisors throughout the world a report that shows how their specific team responded to the questions on the survey – the goal being for them to meet with their work groups, discuss the results and plan changes to improve the way that their teams function,” said Mills.

  

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12/4/2012 7:50 AM