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​North American Safety and Security Manager Rick Puckett instructs a group of trainees during a safety leadership course held at Lima Engine Plant.
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 Safety Training Courses Provide Knowledge, Influence Culture Change at Lima Engine Plant

DATE: Will be calculated from "Release Start Date" field.

​LIMA, Ohio - “Nobody gets hurt on purpose,” said Ford Motor Company’s Safety and Security Manager Rick Puckett. Unfortunately, though, workplace accidents do occur. 
 
With that knowledge, Lima Engine Plant (LEP) leadership, along with UAW 1219 representatives, recently participated in safety leadership training courses that focused on minimizing the chance of injury by identifying everyday hazards in the workplace.
 
“Safety leadership training is designed to teach leaders specific skills and knowledge to influence culture,” Puckett said, adding “This training focuses on the human factors that drive decision-making, risk-taking and acceptance.”
 
During the safety leadership course, trainees spent time in a classroom-setting covering the impact of non-verbal messaging on human behavior and perception of expectations.
 
The training was hands-on and trainees toured various areas of LEP attempting to identify potential hazards.

“When you look at the same things every day, it might be easy to become complacent about it because you’re looking at it every day,” said LEP’s Safety Engineer Parker Kronour. “This training focused on conditioning our minds to be able to identify these potential hazards and work to correct them.”
 
The trainees broke off into groups to tour areas of the plant and identified conditions that could be possible safety hazards surrounding ladders and everyday workplace equipment. “The training is a combination of classroom and ‘hands-on’ floor exercises designed to teach tow basic subjects,” Puckett said, adding “We look at how and why the human mind works to hide hazards from our perception, as well as identifying some of the basic techniques that can be quickly learned and acquired to improve our ability to not only see hazards, but react to them.”

 
 
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3/28/2014 6:00 AM