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​Cardboard from the battery department is separated before being placed into bins for recycling.
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 Rawsonville Plant gives new meaning to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle

DATE: Will be calculated from "Release Start Date" field.

​It may be hard to imagine what two million pounds of cardboard looks like, but can you envision 16,000 trees flourishing in a forest?  Or perhaps five million sheets of paper?  Not only did Rawsonville Plant recycle that much in 2013, but they also increased its volume by one million pounds from 2012.
 
To accomplish this requires a huge cross functional team effort that goes way beyond filling your average blue recycling bin. In fact, up to 30 array component cardboard boxes from the battery department are segregated in the decant operation by Material Planning and Logistics (MP&L) employees who carefully place them into deep blue gondolas. The materials are then pulled out by cleaners every 15 minutes to a cardboard compactor during production hours.
 
“This is not only great for the environment, but it helps to offset our disposal costs while also allowing us to manage our waste streams,” said Environmental Engineer Kim Gamble.
 
After the cardboard leaves Rawsonville it then heads to Taylor Recycling to be packaged into bales and shipped to a paper mill to be reprocessed and used again. This method of recycling is repeated and then tracked by the on-site Total Waste Manager on a monthly basis to ensure the plant meets its yearly target goal.
 
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2/25/2014 12:00 AM