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 Moving Assembly Line Series: 100th Anniversary and Photo Gallery

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Game Changer: 100th Anniversary of the Moving Assembly Line

When Henry Ford began making cars in the early 1900s, “state-of-the-art” manufacturing meant car bodies delivered by horse-drawn carriage, with teams of workers assembling automobiles atop sawhorses. The teams would rotate from one station to another, doing their part to bring the vehicle together. Parts deliveries were timed, but often ran late causing pile-ups of workers vying for space and delays in production. Fortunately for the future of industry, these archaic practices came to an end Oct. 7, 1913.

Observers of the time were already suggesting that someone needed to invent a way to mass produce cars, and by doing so bring down the price to enable more people to afford the luxury. J.J. Seaton wrote in Harper’s Weekly in January 1910 that “the man who can successfully solve this knotty question and produce a car that will be entirely sufficient mechanically, and whose price will be within the reach of millions who cannot yet afford automobiles, will not only grow rich but will be considered a public benefactor.”

Continue Reading: Game Changer: 100th Anniversary of the Moving Assembly Line



Celebrating the Moving Assembly Line in Pictures

The pictures located in this gallery tell a story of just how innovative the moving assembly line was at its genesis and how continued progress has refined the process over the last ten decades.

Visit the Photo Gallery: Celebrating the Moving Assembly Line in Pictures

 
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9/23/2013 9:00 AM