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​Three generations from L to R: Wendell York, Ben York and Tug
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 More Than a Job - A Lifestyle

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​In 1995, a 6 foot, 4 inch, 245 lb. high school senior was featured in the Transmitter – the UAW Local 863 newsletter.  The story discussed this young man and his love for the restoration of cars, along with his hopes of one day working at Ford Sharonville alongside his father.  More than 15 years later, that young man – better known as Darrel 'Tugboat' York – can say he did just that.
 
"Dad hired in during May 1977 and 20 years later, I was right there next to him," he said.  "At one point, we were on the same line working on the same equipment." It really was the completion of a lifelong dream, which is evident from Tug's first memory.
 
"There's a picture of me and my dad when I was 3-years-old.  I'm propped inside the hood of his black '78 Ford F150 . . . just watching every move," said Tug of his early love for cars.  And since then, his passion has only grown.
 
After graduating high school, Tug worked for various automotive component companies under GM.  Then, in 1997 he hired in at the Sharonville Transmission Plant (STP).  There, he is a highly active member of the UAW, helping with plant events and community fundraisers.
 
"The people of UAW Local 863 are very giving individuals.  Every time there is a need, this local steps up," Tug said in reference to his peers.  "Without them, events and fundraisers would be impossible."
 
His work at STP keeps him on the move, but for this car enthusiast, the work is never done.  Tug is also an active member of several different car clubs including Tri-State F100 and Tri-State Mustang - an appropriate hobby for someone who's either building cars, working on cars or painting cars.
 
Over the years Tug has seen dozens of cars come and go.  But when asked about his favorite, he can immediately respond.  "When I was 16-years-old, I laid my eyes on a 1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II – gosh . . . that thing was beautiful," he mumbled, "I've never actually owned it but yeah – that's the prettiest thing I've ever seen."
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1/2/2013 10:00 AM